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 Turn based structure of the turn

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PostSubject: Turn based structure of the turn   Wed Jan 18, 2012 8:46 am

This is mainly a guide for the interractions created by the passing of priority in a turn I will use for a future article and for reference for others. Before all else I once again advise reading SCtheOnly's guide to priority http://www.pojo.biz/board/showpost.php?p=13006354&postcount=6
Be reminded that the below article is meant to be a guideline, to initiate people in the structure of the turn, there are bound to be errors since not all knowledge is available. Help is appreciated.

Now let us define some things that will be coming up, while I will assume that by now you are aware that priority exists throughout the turn and is not something limited to the summon response window. If you don't, study. Now. If you are not familiar with the structure of the turns in yugioh, tell me so I can give you rank 1, or worse.

First I will be putting here one of my posts from "Boulder Canyon Classroom" about response windows, again a term that we will be needing defined.
Response Windows/Chains:
 

While priority is something that exists throughout the turn it often takes different forms. When responding to you setting a card you have priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect only, while when you enter the battle step of the battle phase, aside from activating a spell speed 2 or higher effect you also have priority to declare an attack.

A term that will be coming up is "General Priority", which is always specific to the respective turn/step it is mentioned for. While the turn player has general priority in a phase/step he is allowed to perform any legal action of that phase/step. The player usually has general priority when entering a phase or step, he also has general priority when all response windows close.

e.g. When entering the battle step of the battle phase the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect or declare an attack.

When entering main phase 2 the turn player has priority to summon a monster, set a card, activate a card/card effect, change the battle position of a monster.


Something that often happens throughout the game is chains. A chain may consist of any number of chain links, there is a misconception among some that a single card effect that uses the chain does not constitute a chain unless it is chained to, which is false, activating monster reborn and chaining nothing to it still makes a chain, one that has only 1 link, monster reborn. You'll notice that by the rules of priority it is often that you can activate spell speed 2 or higher effects, enough in fact to give a player the illusion that they can be activated at any time, and by that a chain may start at many, many times within a single turn. That again is closely tied to ,and needed to explain, the rules that govern turn player priority.

At a time you as the turn player, or your opponent after you pass priority, may activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect (1 as well if it is the turn player), and this is where the biggest "game of ping-pong" happens. Activating an effect that uses the chain automatically passes priority. At that time the opponent alone has the right to chain to whatever you activated. If the opponent does use that right and chains something the right is passed back to you and you alone have the right to activate an effect that uses the chain. If the opponent instead did not want to activate anything he is obliged to pass priority back to you and now again you alone have the right to activate an effect that uses the chain. This continues for both players until neither player wishes to add anything more to the chain.

Once that happens the chain starts resolving. Then, responding to the resolution of the chain, and assuming that no trigger effects triggered and activated in response, the appropriate response window opens, responding to the resolution of the chain and anything that happened last in the chain, at which point the turn player now has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect in response. If he does not wish to activate anything in response then that right is passed and the opponent can activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect in response to the same things. If either player wishes to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect in response, the process repeats itself. If the non-turn player passes as well, the turn player usually gains general priority of the phase/step.

Let's make an example
Larry is the turn player, and at the start of his main phase he wishes to activate Heavy Storm.
Priority automatically passes as Heavy Storm went to chain link 1, and Tesla, the non-turn player, chains Starlight Road to Heavy Storm.
The right to chain is again with Larry who activates Mystical Space Typhoon from his hand, targetting his own Heavy Storm to prevent the summon of Stardust Dragon.
Priority passes again automatically, but Tesla does not wish to make use of it and passes back. Larry now adds to the chain Accomulated Fortune, in order to draw 2 cards.
Now priority once again is automatically passed, and Tesla makes use of it to chain Seven Tools of the Bandit to Accomulated Fortune by paying 1000 Life Points at activation.
Passing right back, Larry gets the right and chains with Curse of Royal.
Tesla can now chain but chooses not to, Larry can as well but wishes not to as well. The chain resolves.

Curse of Royal negates the activation of Seven Tools of the Bandit and kicks it from the chain. Accomulated Fortune allows Larry to draw 2 cards. Mystical Space Typhoon destroys Heavy Storm. Starlight Road negates the effect of Heavy Storm. Heavy Storm resolves without effect.

In response to the resolution of the chain a response window opens responding to the resolution of a chain and empty resolution of Heavy Storm, along with whatever that implies.

2 things to remember here is that things above are not always true because chains may be formed in any phase or step, however (1) there are phases or steps that have restrictions as to what can be activated in them or (2) if a response to the resolution can even exist and of course if general priority is gained afterwards. One example would be the damage step, during the damage step not any spell speed 2 or higher effect may be activated, there are hefty restrictions in what you can or cannot activate. And of course even if priority is passed back if the opponent activated a spell speed 3 effect you can not respond with a spell speed 2 effect. While naturally some effects have specific activation conditions and can only be activated in their specific response window, even if you have priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect that doesn't mean you can activate Solemn Warning in response to an attack declaration. Furthermore, as stated above, not always general priority will be gained after passing and some chains resolutions may not be able to even be responded to. For example, the damage step is packed with windows of events/activations, once a chain is formed and resolves play immidiatelly moves on to the next window (sub-step), the turn player does not gain general priority and will not be responding to the resolution with new chains indefinitelly.
Another example is after a player has discarded for the hand size limit. There are cases where an effect may be triggered and activate at the time, creating a chain that may gain new chain links by the regular process, but because discarding for the hand size limit must be the last thing to happen in the turn, its resolution cannot be responded to at all.

Remember that when trying to exit a phase/step and move on to the next, you pass priority, and then the opponent may activate an appropriate spell speed 2 or higher effect. If the opponent passes as well then you move on to the next phase/step. If the opponent however does activate an appropriate card/effect then chain rules kick in, the chain is formed, its resolution is responded to and after all response windows have closed you return to that phase/step, usually with general priority of that phase step. You do not have to move on unless you once again declare your intention to move to the next phase/step. Take that as a loop.

Then we have the critters interfering with the rights of players, trigger effects. Trigger/Trigger-like effects disregard player priority. They will activate when their trigger is met, which means either in the appropriate response window (the one that responds to their trigger being met, for example "Peten the Dark Clown" will activate in the window which responds that Peten being sent to the graveyard, if it exists), or if they cannot miss the timing, in the first available response window that appears at which they can start a chain (For example when synchro summoning using Dandylion, the first response window to appear is the summon negation window, however trigger effects cannot start a chain in the summon negation window, therefore Dandylion has to wait until the summon response window, at which point it can start a chain.)

For example when synchro summoning Brionac you would normally have priority to activate its ignition effect, making sure it goes through even if the opponent has a Bottomless Trap Hole. However if T.G. Hyper Librarian exists on either side of the field, during the summon response window his effect will force its own activation, placing itself at chain link 1. At this point instead of summon response priority, an effect has been activated, and the opponent of the player controlling T.G. Hyper Librarian only gets priority to chain, with a spell speed 2 or higher effect, as a chain has started. As it is still however a summon response window, Bottomless Trap Hole may be activated as well, to banish Brionac before it can use its effect.

There are also the special cases of mandatory quick effects (Doomcaliber Knight and Light and Darkness Dragon) that will again act on their own disregarding player priority.

The main issue of all above effects is that they start a chain, with the player controlling the card/effect considered to have placed the chain link, which puts us back at chain rules, as they have been mentioned above, instead of the specific priority.

Multiple trigger effects trying to activate in the same response window is when, and why, what we call SEGOC chains are made, governed by their own SEGOC rules and after the last trigger effect by regular chaining rules.

With that we finally move in the turn based structure of a turn, as dictated by the rules which govern turn player priority.

The Turn

Draw Phase
Entering the Draw Phase the first action is drawing for your turn. Then a response window opens for drawing/adding a card from the deck to the hand/adding a card to the hand or whatever your first draw for the turn implies. At the time the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect in response. He can pass that right, at which point the non-turn player may respond with a spell speed 2 or higher effect. If both players pass the turn player may declare exiting the draw phase. If the non-turn player passes as well play moves to the Standby Phase.

Standby Phase
Standby Phase. Be reminded that this phase is made for card effects which activate there, general priority of the standby phase only means you can activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect (inb4curseoffiend) and perform no special action like the draw phase at which you draw a card. Entering the Standby phase the turn player may activate a trigger effect with a correct activation timing (for example treeborn frog or the immortal bushi) or a spell speed 2 or higher effect. When both players are done forming and responding to chains, by regular chain rules, the turn player may declare moving on to the main phase, while passing priority since he wishes to end a phase/step.

Main Phase 1
When entering Main Phase 1, you have pretty much the absolute right of absolute rights in this game. Entering the main phase you have general priority of the main phase, that means priority to:
-Summon a monster
That is not limited to normal summons, all summons are included, the only difference between normal summons and all other summons, apart from card effects which specify and categorize summons, is that you are only allowed for 1 normal summon or set per turn.
-Set a monster
-Set a spell or trap card
-Activate a spell or trap card, or the effect of a monster, spell or trap card, of any spell speed (note that no counter trap card that may be activated with that timing exists at this time however)
-Change the battle position of a monster

So unless you are passing your turn or are set up and wish simply to attack, you will probably making use of your general priority here in order to play Yu-Gi-Oh, which had brought up the subject of the mind crush "pro plays" at another article.

Setting a card (monster, spell or trap) and changing the battle position of a monster, the appropriate response window opens, at which point the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect.

Naturally activating a card/effect which uses the chain starts a chain, at which point chain rules kick in.

When the turn player attempts to summon a monster, a more complicated process begins, which was explained in the some of the first paragraphs of the summon rules article http://www.worldduelingacademy.com/t96-summons-and-the-rules-related-to-them
After declaring the summon, priority does not pass to the opponent and you enter the summon negation window, at which point the turn player still maintains priority to negate his own summon. However play cannot proceed unless he either activates a card effect to negate that summon (highly unlikely) or pass his priority, at which point the non-turn player may activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect, which would negate the summon. Chains here however may only be started by card effects which negate summons. If a chain is formed here and that chain successfully negates the summon, then the regular resolution response window is opened. If either both players pass during the summon negation window, or the chain formed did not negate the summon of the monster
(e.g. Chain Link 1: Solemn Warning
Chain Link 2: Solemn Judgment)
play proceeds, the summon is successful and the summon response window opens.
At the summon response window the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect, while in the TCG the turn player also has priority to activate the ignition effect of a monster at that time. If he does not wish to maintain that priority he simply passes and the non-turn player can activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect. If either player wishes to activate a card effect, regular chain rules are followed.

However a summon response window is not neccessarily accompanied by a summon negation window.
When a chain is formed, and that chain results in the summon of a monster by the turn player, the summon response window opens and the turn player again has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect while again, in the TCG, the turn player also has priority to activate the ignition effect of a monster.

Events bring response windows, once all response windows close by passing priority back and forth, the turn player gets again general priority putting the turn player where he was at the start of the main phase, for the process to repeat itself until the turn player declares exiting the main phase. At that point he passes priority to the non-turn player and if the non-turn player passes again play moves on. If the non-turn player activates a spell speed 2 or higher effect, chain rules are followed and after the resolution and once all response windows have closed the turn player gets general priority to repeat the process again. Remember the Battle Phase may be skipped, at which case play immidiatelly advances to the End Phase.

Battle Phase
Battle Phase. That is the most complicated phase in the game. The Battle Phase is divided into 4 steps. The Start Step, the Battle Step, the Damage Step and the End Step. Studying the Breakdown of the Battle Phase is recomended http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Breakdown_of_the_Battle_Phase

The Start Step is similar to what the standby phase is to the turn, it is a step for effects. Upon entering the Start Step of the Battle Phase the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect. If he or his opponent choose to do so chain rules are followed, and the player can again declare ending the Start Step at which point he passes priority to do so. Steps are treated as Phases in these aspects, if the turn player wishes to end the Start Step he must pass his priority, his opponent may either agree, at which case play proceeds to the Battle Step, or activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect, at which point we again start following chain rules, a resolution response window after the resolution and after that closes the turn player gets once again general priority of the Start Step (which, similarly to the draw phase, standby phase etc. , is not different from resolution response priority for example) repeating the process. This continues until both players wish to exit the Start Step. It may seem that the Start Step is insignificant, but it is of use because the rules of priority exist. Plays like activating Threatening Roar for example must be performed here. If done during the main phase the turn player may alter his game plan, while it will not be able to block all attacks in the Battle Step for reasons that will be explained later.

After the Start Step ends play proceeds to the Battle Step. During the Battle Step the player is able to declare attacks with his monsters that are able to do so. Therefore having General Priority of the battle step means you can either activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect or declare an attack. To clarify further, upon entering the Battle Step and before anything else happens the turn player has the right to declare an attack. This is something to remember and which may occassionally come up, not only because threatening roar has missed its chance to stop the first attack, but also because, after the damage step ends, play returns to the Battle Step, not the Start Step, at which point the turn player again has the right to declare an attack. Once a player declares an attack and selects an attack target, the attack declaration response window opens, where the turn player has priority to respond with a spell speed 2 or higher effect to his own attack declaration, and of course if he passes the opponent may respond to the attack declaration with a spell speed 2 or higher effect. However play does not move on to the next step automatically, it is still a step so in order to move on to the damage step the turn player must declare entering the damage step at which point, still in the battle step, he passes priority and his opponent may either accept to proceed or activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect. Even though the attack is still ongoing it is similar to the regular precedure of exiting a phase/step, where if either player starts a chain you follow the chain rules and then a resolution response window opens after resolution. Any number of chains may be created between attack declaration and the damage step. However the turn player will not gain again general priority of that battle step unless the attack is stopped, since if both players pass the response resolution window the only available actions is starting a new chain with a spell speed 2 or higher effect or attempting to enter the Damage Step.

If between attack declaration and entering the Damage Step either available attack targets leave the opponent's side of the field or new available attack targets appear, a replay occurs. During a replay, play does not return to before attack declaration however and cards like mirror force may not be activated, it is simply selecting a new attack target or stopping the attack, and unless the attack is stopped, play is still between attack declaration and the damage step.

Damage Step (TCG). The damage step itself is the reason the battle phase is the most complicated phase of the turn. By now you must have heard all sorts of bits and pieces of information concerning the damage step, but if I had to describe what it is, it is several events and response windows back to back, simply that. I link once again the Breakdown of the Battle Phase because here it will be needed. http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Breakdown_of_the_Battle_Phase

I could say that in the TCG the damage step has 7 sub-steps. That however would be a white lie. And I am not refering to the "there is no such thing as sub-steps", that is technicalities, something exists and we need to call it something. The reason is the number. 7 is the number of different timings an event may happen within the damage step, anything that happens in the damage step must be in one of those 7 timings. However that is dictated by the events, cards and effects themselves, and many times by individual card rulings.

For example monsters like "Neo-Spacian Grand Mole" must activate in the damage step but before monsters are flipped face-up by battle (while of course other things happen as well in the same timing). So we assign a timing for those. Nothing happens before those in the damage step so there is no earlier timing, this is the first timing, we name it Start of the Damage Step and unnoficially give it the number 1 for reference.

Effects like that of "Blast Sphere happen" after monsters are flipped face up by battle and before damage calculation, therefore we assign a timing for those placing it between the timing monsters are flipped face up and the timing we called Start of the Damage Step. That happens immidiatelly before Damage Calculation without any timings intervening, so we will call it Before Damage Calculation.

The afforementioned flipping of monsters happens after the Start of the Damage Step and before the timing of Before Damage Calculation, with no other known timing between the two. We will call that timing with the explicit name, Flipping the Face-Down Monster Face-Up, and since now we have found 3 timings in a row, we will give this timing unnoficially the number 2 and since we have figured only 2 timings preceed the Before Damage Calculation timing, we will give that one the number 3.

We repeat this process for every seperate timing we have by the seperate rulings we get and find the 7 sub-steps of the damage step. Of course multiple different things may be able to happen in the same timing, for example the continuous attack gaining effects, like that of "Jain, Lightsworn Paladin" or "T.G. Rush Rhino", happen at the Start of the Damage Step. No new sub-step is needed to explain that.

The reason I said that the 7 is a white lie, is that if in the next set we had a card that would activate after Flipping the Face-Down Monster Face-Up and before the Before Damage Calculation timings (ss2 and ss3), a new timing would be created to explain that card, it would be number 3, every timing from that point on would be +1 and the sub-steps would now be 8 for the TCG. Now if after that 2 more cards were created with completely seperate timings, the sub-steps would become 10. And so on.

While it is not completely relevant to the matter at hand, it is neccessary to have an understanding of the damage step before we move on. With the above and the Breakdown of the Battle Phase you should be getting a good grasp of what the Damage Step is. It is simply 7 of those timings put back to back, once they start the damage step starts, once they end the damage step ends and we return to the Battle Step.

One thing to remember here is that we may call them unnofficially "sub-steps" but they are not similar to steps. During steps there exists general priority and any number of chains may be formed while to proceed to the next step you need the consent of both players. That is not the case for most of the "sub-steps" of the damage step, there is a single response window and once it closes or the chain formed there resolves, play advances to the next "sub-step" and whatever that brings. So for example if your opponent activates Honest during damage calculation you cannot wait for the chain to resolve in damage calculation and activate Honest afterwards. Once the chain resolves you move on to Battle Damage - After Damage Calculation, where Honest cannot be activated. One reason for that is that most of them are specific response windows, and while up to and including "Before Damage Calculation" you can activate specific spell speed 2 effects (altering ATK/DEF) freely, from that point onward the few cards you can activate are those with specific activation timings there, once that chain resolves you have naturally left that response window, so even those cards no longer have the correct timing to be activated so you can no longer activate anything even if you stay there. It is pointless and therefore play proceeds. At the same time, remember that if 2 or more trigger effects activate at the same timing, they form a chain. Also remember that if a trigger effect activates in a specific response window, that chain is still responding to the same thing, so if at Battle Damage, Spirit Reaper's effect activates, Numinous Healer may be chained to it as the activation timing is still correct.

With that let's start. Entering the Damage Step and the Start of the Damage Step, unless a trigger effect activates and starts a chain (at which point naturally you follow chain rules), the turn player has priority to activate spell speed 2 effect which alters ATK/DEF. (Remember the specific restrictions for activating cards and effects in the damage step, they always apply regardless of priority, this is not the subject of this article and unneeded to understand it so it will be skipped.)
Once a single chain has resolved or both players passed priority play moves on to Flipping the Face-Down Monster Face-Up

No trigger effects occur here, again the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 effect that alters ATK/DEF. When either one chain has resolved or both players passed priority play moves on to the next timing and what we call Before Damage Calculation. Unless a trigger effect activates with this timing, at which case again we follow chaining rules, the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 effect which alters ATK/DEF. One thing to remember here is that Before Damage Calculation is not similar to the other timings because except from the timing of the trigger effects, it is not a single timing. To explain what I mean, let's look at the name.
Before Damage Calculation.
Remember the window that we called in the Battle Step Before the Damage Step?
That was not a single timing, it was everything that happens between the attack declaration and the Damage Step, that meant multiple chains could be formed there.
Before Damage Calculation is something similar, play cannot move to Damage Calculation without mutual concent of the players, so multiple chains (started of course by a spell speed 2 effect which alters ATK/DEF) may be formed here. As wikia explains, even if your Rush Recklesly is negated by Magic Jammer, you may activate another one after the chain resolves and before Damage Calculation. The reason you would want to do that is that you can no longer activate these cards/effects during Damage Calculation. Therefore all the chains formed here fall into the Before Damage Calculation "sub-step". Naturally chain rules are followed and then resolution response, until play moves on to the Damage Calculation, or During Damage Calculation as the timing is named.

During Damage Calculation you may only form one chain with effects that may be activated at this timing (For example "Honest") and effects that negate them (for example Doomcaliber Knight, Chivarly, etc.). The turn player has priority to start the chain, if he passes the non-turn player may start it. If a chain starts, chain rules are followed, if either a chain is not formed or a single chain is formed and resolves, play proceeds to Battle Damage - After Damage Calculation.

Battle Damage - After Damage Calculation. Assuming no trigger effect like Spirit Reaper or Gorz, The Emmissary of Darkness, activated here, at which case chain rules would be followed, the turn player has priority to activate cards with specific activation timings here, like Attack and Receive, Numinous Healer etc. as you can find in wikia. After the response window has closed play advances.

Resolve Effects. During this timing appropriate trigger and flip effects activate. You may not start a chain apart from those, you can however, following chain rules, chain with cards which negate the activation of those effects. Once the chain resolves or if a chain does not occur, play advances.

End of the Damage Step. Assuming no appropriate trigger effect activates here, at which case regular chain rules are followed, the turn player has priority to activate cards with individual card rulings/specific card text allowing them to be activated here, such as Michizure. After a single chain has resolved or no chain occured, play returns to the Battle Step.

Congratulations, you are out of the swamp that is the Damage Step.

After returning to the Battle Step the turn player once again has general priority of the Battle Step. He may repeat the process to enter the Damage Step again, either player may form chains or the turn player may state he wishes to enter the End Step of the Battle Phase, and pass priority to do so as it happens in regular steps/phases.

Upon entering the End Step of the Battle Phase the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 or higher effect or the trigger effects of monsters which activate in the End Step of the Battle Phase. Remember that it is not a single timing, it is an entire step, so even if multiple trigger effects are to activate here they will not neccessarily form a chain, unless they must activate in the same response window, but form seperate chains. For example, if Tesla's Gladiator Beast Laquari attacked Larry's defense position Gladiator Beast Hoplomus, then Tesla has priority to activate the effect of Gladiator Beast Laquari. Regular chain rules are followed, but as Hoplomus has a spell speed 1 trigger effect it cannot be chained to the effect of Laquari as it is not a SEGOC situation. Laquari will first resolve, if it brings Gladiator Beast Murmillo, Murmillo's effect will trigger as well (remember that it is not a case of chaining to pass priority anyway, even if it was not summon response, it is the response to the resolution of a chain), which can target Hoplomus and destroy it at resolution, meaning that as the turn player Tesla can stop Larry's Hoplomus from tagging out because of turn player priority. In fact Tesla can activate the trigger effects of all his gladiator beasts, if let's say, 5 gladiator beasts attacked the Hoplomus, before Larry can activate his, since priority passes automatically in a chain, but not otherwise. The End Step of the Battle Phase still requires mutual consent to advance, even more so since it is also the end of a Phase.

The Main Phase 2 is similar to the Main Phase 1, with the only difference that you cannot enter the Battle Phase. There are also cards that specifically name either one of course.

End Phase
Of course upon entering the End Phase the turn player has priority to activate a spell speed 2 effect. He can also activate the trigger effects which activate in the end phase or apply them, in a similar fashion to the End Step of the Battle Phase. Again it is an entire phase, if 2 effects activate here it does not mean they chain to each other. And again the turn player may activate all of his before the opponent.

One thing to not here is the difference between mandatory and optional effects. A player may need to activate/apply his effect after the opponent has activated/applied his effect. For example the Lightsworn player wishes to mill with his Lightsworn monster but the opponent has used Effect Veiler during the main phase of the same turn. If he chooses to activate the effect of his Lightsworn monster before Effect Veiler "wears off" then it will be negated and he will not mill. If first Effect Veiler "wears off" and then he activates the effect, naturally he will mill. Luckily there is a rule dictating such interractions.

The turn player has priority to activate his effects. He has the right to pass his priority, so that the non-turn player can activate his. If the non-turn player passes again though, the turn player cannot pass his priority for mandatory effects, he is oblidged to activate them now. So the rule is, you can only pass once for mandatory effects. Analyzing that we get the conclusion that the turn player has the right to activate/apply his mandatory effects first, while the non-turn player has the right to activate/apply his mandatory effects second. Looking at it the other way, the turn player can force the non-turn player to activate/apply his effects second while the non-turn player has the right to force the turn player to activate/apply his effects first. Back in the Lightsworn example, if the turn player intends to mill, but the non-turn player does not want to let him, the non-turn player wins, because the turn player will pass his priority for the non-turn player to end the negation of Effect Veiler, but the non-turn player will pass back, at which point the turn player will be forced to activate the mill effect of his Lightsworn monster while negated.

Note however that the above only applies to mandatory effects. As far as optional effects are concerned, you can pass back and forth indefinitelly (so long of course as you are not needlessly stalling), which also means you can force all mandatory effects to resolve first, regardless of turn player and non-turn player status.

After both players are done forming chains (for a more detailed guide in case it is not clear you can check this http://www.pojo.biz/board/showpost.php?p=17988821&postcount=5) play proceeds to the the end of the End Phase and discarding for the Hand Size limit. Discarding for the Hand Size limit must be the last thing to happen in the turn. If a mandatory effect or an effect with a specific activation timing is triggered by discarding for the hand size limit, a chain is formed and chain rules are followed while the appropriate restriction to HSL chains apply. The resolution of the chain cannot be responded to. After the chain resolves, if the turn player has once again more than 6 cards in his hand, he again performs the discard for the hand size limit. After the player has discarded for the hand size limit, and the chain from the trigger effect resolved, or did not occur, while the player has 6 cards or less in his hand, the turn ends, and the next turn begins.


I will be correcting/clearing these as I go.


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